A Week in History

On this week in history (9th to 15th July inclusive) as follows;

  • 1643 – In the English Civil War, the Cavaliers take an early victory over Oliver Cromwell’s Roundheads at Roundway Down
  • 1900 – The Paris Metro opens
  • 1923 – The British parliament passes a law banning the sale of alcohol to under-18s
  • 1925 – In Dublin, 25 year old Oonagh Keogh becomes the first female member of a stock exchange
  • 1930 – Australian batsman Don Bradman broke all Test cricket records with a score of 334 runs against England
  • 1930 – The first World Cup football tournament is held in Montevideo, Uruguay
  • 1944 – The RAF becomes the first air force to use jet aircraft in operational service
  • 1957 – Elvis Presley gets his first UK No. 1 with ‘All Shook Up’
  • 1964 – The Bahamas gain their independence from Britain
  • 1967 – The British parliament votes to legalise abortion
  • 1979 – US Skylab burns up on re-entering the earth’s atmosphere after 6 years in space
  • 1982 – Hostilities between Britain and Argentina over the Falkland Islands are officially ended
  • 1984 – York Minster was struck by lightning causing a fire in the roof which destroyed the south transept of the 700 year old building
  • 1985 – The Greenpeace protest ship the Rainbow Warrior sank in Auckland harbour after 2 explosions tore her hull apart
  • 1990 – A 15 mile stretch of the Cumbrian coast is declared unsafe after items contaminated by the leaks from Sellafield nuclear plant in 1983 are washed up on the beach

And some notable birthdays include;

  • 100BC – Julius Caesar, Roman general and statesman who became a dictator
  • 1274 – Robert I, Scottish monarch known as Robert the Bruce
  • 1573 – Inigo Jones, English architect famed for designing the Queen’s House in Greenwich and the Banqueting Hall at Whitehall
  • 1606 – Rembrandt van Rijn, Dutch painter, etcher and draughtsman
  • 1730 – Josiah Wedgewood, English potter, industrialist and writer
  • 1854 – George Eastman, American inventor of the Kodak camera
  • 1858 – Emmeline Pankhurst, English leader of the suffragette movement
  • 1895 – Oscar Hammerstein, American lyricist who, in collaboration with Richard Rogers wrote many hit musicals
  • 1912 – Woody Guthrie, American folk singer, guitarist and composer
  • 1915 – Yul Brynner, American film and television star
  • 1916 – Edward Heath, British Conservative politician and prime minister
  • 1918 – Ingmar Bergman, Swedish film and theatre director
  • 1942 – Harrison Ford, American film actor famed for his roles in Star Wars and as Indiana Jones
  • 1953 – Leon Spinks, American boxer who took the world heavyweight title from Muhammad Ali
  • 1960 – Ian Hislop, editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye