This Week In History

On this week in history (12th to 17th September inclusive) as follows;

• 1788 – New York becomes the federal capital of the United States
• 1868 – The first recorded hole in one is scored by Scottish golfer Tom Morris during the Open Championship at Prestwick
• 1878 – Cleopatra’s Needle, the obelisk of Thothimes III, is erected on London’s Thames Embankment
• 1908 – In the USA, Buick and Oldsmobile merge under the name of General Motors
• 1910 – The world’s first policewoman is appointed by the Los Angeles police department
• 1931 – Long-playing records are demonstrated in New York by RCA-Victor
• 1935 – American millionaire Howard Hughes achieves an aviation record, flying an aeroplane of his own design at 352.46mph
• 1944 – Operation ‘Market Garden’ begins as British airborne forces land at Arnhem in Holland to facilitate the invasion of Germany
• 1957 – The 1998th performance of ‘The Mousetrap’ makes it Britain’s longest running play
• 1960 – The Organisation of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) is created by Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela
• 1966 – Britain’s first nuclear submarine, HMS Resolution, is launched by the Queen Mother
• 1970 – England football captain Bobby Moore is accused of stealing a diamond bracelet from a shop in Mexico
• 1975 – Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, canonised by Pope Paul VI, becomes the first American saint
• 1977 – The lead singer of the pop group T-Rex, Marc Bolan, dies in a car crash in London at the age of 29
• 2010 – Pope Benedict XVI begins the first papal visit to Britain since Henry VIII’s split with Rome

And some notable birthdays include;

• 1387 – Henry V, English monarch who defeated the French at Agincourt
• 1789 – James Fenimore Cooper, American author best remembered for ‘The last of the Mohicans’
• 1860 – John Pershing, American general who commanded the US Expeditionary Force in Europe in WWI
• 1890 – Agatha Christie, English crime writer and one of the most successful novelists of all time
• 1901 – Sir Francis Chichester, English yachtsman and aviator who was knighted for sailing solo around the world in his yacht ‘Gypsy Moth IV’
• 1910 – Jack Hawkins, British stage and film actor
• 1916 – Margaret Lockwood, British stage and film actress
• 1916 – Roald Dahl, British author famed for his children’s books and macabre tales for adults
• 1924 – Lauren Bacall, American film actress and wife of Humphrey Bogart
• 1925 – Charlie Byrd, American jazz guitarist
• 1925 – B B King, American blues guitarist
• 1934 – Maureen Connolly, American grand slam tennis player known as ‘Little Mo’
• 1967 – Michael Johnson, American runner famous for his upright style, who won double Olympic gold in Atlanta in 1996
• 1971 – Stella McCartney, English fashion designer and daughter of former Beatle Paul and photographer Linda
• 1984 – Prince Henry of Wales, commonly known as Harry, the second son of Charles and Diana