Week in history

Week in history (31st July to 6th August inclusive) as follows;

• 1831 – The new London Bridge is opened by William IV and Queen Adelaide
• 1834 – The South Australian Association gains a charter to form a colony
• 1858 – Completion of the world’s first transatlantic telegraph cable between Ireland and Newfoundland
• 1914 – Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany rejects a British offer of mediation in the Austro-Serbian crisis as ‘insolence’
• 1914 – The first electric traffic lights are installed in Cleveland, Ohio
• 1932 – The Nazi Party doubles its representation in the Reichstag
• 1945 – The Potsdam Conference, the final allied summit of WWII, ends.
• 1954 – Britain’s first supersonic fighter plane, the P-1 English Electric Lightning, makes its maiden flight
• 1962 – Film star Marilyn Munroe was found dead in the bedroom of her Hollywood home
• 1964 – A Rolling Stones concert in Belfast is halted after only 12 minutes because of rioting fans
• 1965 – Cigarette commercials are banned on British TV
• 1969 – The first pictures of the planet Mars are beamed back to earth by the unmanned US Mariner 6 spacecraft
• 2000 – In London, the Queen Mother celebrates her 100th birthday
• 2003 – Gene Robinson becomes the first openly gay bishop in the Anglican communion
• 2010 – President Obama announces the official end of US combat operations in Iraq

And some notable birthdays include;

• 1809 – Alfred Lord Tennyson, English poet best known for ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’
• 1867 – Stanley Baldwin, 3 time British conservative prime minister
• 1881 – Alexander Fleming, Scottish scientist who discovered penicillin
• 1911 – Lucille Ball, American comedienne who starred in the series ‘I Love Lucy’
• 1912 – Milton Friedman, American economist and advocate of the free market economy
• 1920 – P D James, British crime writer
• 1928 – Andy Warhol, American artist whose self-portrait sold for £1.8m in 2011
• 1930 – Neil Armstrong, American astronaut and first man on the moon
• 1932 – Peter O’Toole, Irish actor
• 1938 – Terry Wogan, Irish broadcaster
• 1940 – Martin Sheen, American film actor
• 1961 – Barrack Hussein Obama, elected 44th President of the USA in 2009 and the first African-American to hold the office
• 1961 – Walter Swinburne, Irish jockey who won the Derby in 1981 on Shergar
• 1965 – J K Rowling, British author who created the Harry Potter books
• 1965 – Sam Mendes, English stage and film director